259 results for author: Mark Hathaway


266 – Psalm 5 – My, Your, Their

Please read all twelve verses of Psalm five.  Sometimes I have a hard time concentrating. I knew I was going to write about Psalm five so I read through it the first time. I have no idea where my mind was, but it was certainly not on what I read. I could recall nothing. So I told myself to pay attention and began again. Before I finished the twelfth and final verse the second time, I realized I had not paid attention and could recall nothing. With mounting disappointment in myself, I again seized my mind, “Pay Attention!” I chided and began again. What is going on? Again nothing!  Has this ever happened to you? I wondered, is this ...

265 – Psalm 4 – Verses five through eight

Book one of the Psalms includes Psalms one through forty-one and are Davidic. They were added to the official collection before King David’s death. As a reminder, the Psalms are not grouped in any specific way. They are simply numbered according to when they were added to the official collection. Scholars have grouped the Psalms together according to common attributes so we end up with psalm categories like Historical, relational, imprecatory, penitential, messianic, and liturgical. Of course, some scholars create even more categories but these are the most recognizable ones. If we had to assign Psalm four to one of the above categories ...

264 – Psalm 4 – Verses two through four

Have you ever had an “aha!” moment while reading the word of God? Well, I had one. I’ve always read Psalm 4:2 thinking there was a change of speaker from verse one. I knew that David was the one talking in verse one, but I assumed it was Yahweh suddenly speaking in verse two for two reasons. One, “O you sons of men” sounds like something Yahweh would say. Two, I assumed the presence of the words “my glory” must mean God was talking. But truth be told there is no indication in the text that there has been a speaker change between verses one and two. Psalm 4:1-2 (NKJV) 1 Hear me when I call, O God of my righteousness! You have ...

263 – Psalm 4 – verse one

When we read the Bible, I fear the tendency for most Christians is to just read past the things we don’t understand. Maybe we don’t know how to dig for meaning, maybe we are being lazy, or maybe we’ve concluded it doesn’t really matter as long as we understand the “important” things. There can be lots of reasons we don’t dig for meaning, but do you ever struggle over a Biblical passage in an effort to understand it?  I’m not talking about forcing meaning on the text. I mean spending time pouring over the text, reading and re-reading the passage, praying earnestly that the Holy Spirit would illuminate the word of God to your ...

263 – Psalm 3 – Verse by Verse

Psalm 3 is only eight verses long. You should read through it before continuing here. In a very real sense, reading this Psalm feels like we just picked up someone’s personal journal and read a very intimate communication between that person and God. The superscription gives us a general idea of when it was penned and tells us precisely the occasion. “A psalm of David at his fleeing from the presence of Absalom, his son.” Psalm 3:1(LEB) 1 Yahweh, how many are my enemies; many are rising against me.  Verse one is written using the Hebrew poetic form of synonymous parallelism. The first thought is repeated by the next using ...

262 – Psalm 2 – Kiss the Son

We ended our time together last time with Psalm 2:5. Psalm 2:5 (LEB) 5 Then he speaks to them in his wrath, and in his fury he terrifies them: Since we are beginning with verse five we need to identify the antecedents (nouns) for the pronouns “he” and “them”.  Verse two clarifies that the kings and rulers of the earth who plot against Yahweh are the “them” of verse five, and Yahweh God is “He”.  What is the message that an Angry God terrifies wicked rulers who plot against Him?  Psalm 2:6 (LEB) 6 “But as for me, I have set my king on Zion, my holy mountain.” But as for me… The word “but” ...

261 – Psalm 2 – Anointed

It might have been nice to begin a study in the book of Psalms with an introduction. Something that could give us information like who wrote the book, the date it was written, any grouping or categories of the Psalms, and how this book relates to the other books in the collection we refer to as the Holy Bible. The one peculiar feature of the book of Psalms is that each individual chapter is self-contained and potentially written by different authors. One possible exception of which I am aware is Psalms one and two. I have heard, but have not studied myself, that Psalms one and two may have originally been one Psalm that was later split into ...

260 – Psalm 1 – Planted

I think the modern-day believer often treats the book of Psalms like spiritual comfort food. When laziness strikes or one doesn’t want to take the time to prepare a scriptural meal and sit down to a more formal dining experience, enter the Psalms. For the most part, each Psalm is a self-contained song in the form of Hebrew poetry and is easily digestible. When the reader feels they need comfort or encouragement or they want to provide the same to another, the Psalms is the likely “go-to” book of the Bible. While I agree the Psalms are packed with great comfort and encouragement, I would caution us to not adopt a casual or whimsical ...

259 – Psalm 148 – Let All Creation Praise Yahweh

We’ve talked about pericopes before, but it seems prudent to say a word or two about them here. They are not a part of the inspired word of God. They are provided by the translators or publishers as a help to the reader. They are simply headings. Sometimes pericopes are a distraction to me. I’ll find myself thinking, “that’s not how I would have labeled this section” or “I wish they wouldn’t have put the pericope there - it introduces an artificial break in the flow of the passage that is distracting if not misleading”. I do find them mildly useful from time to time when I need to locate verses quickly but I only know their ...

258 – Hebrews 4 – The word of God

I wish I could sit down and have a conversation with you. I would like to ask you how you respond to the word of God? My favorite (I think) verse in the Bible is Hebrews 4:12. Hebrews 4:12 (NKJV) For the word of God is living and powerful, and sharper than any two-edged sword, piercing even to the division of soul and spirit, and of joints and marrow, and is a discerner of the thoughts and intents of the heart. As like minded believers we say the Bible (word of God) is accurate and true, but I wonder how deeply we believe verses like this one. Maybe we believe it, but attempt to distance ourselves from the impact? Do we experience the ...